Social Enterprise

A New Type of Hybrid

Social entrepreneurs have taken the hybrid model to a new level, crafting it into what is in effect a single structure that can operate as both a for-profit and a nonprofit.

Much to the chagrin of social entrepreneurs, U.S. law does not currently recognize any single legal entity that can simultaneously accept tax-deductible donated capital (charitable contributions and grants); invested capital (equity investment for which investors seek a market rate of return); and quasi-invested capital (such as loans or program-related investments [PRI] from foundations that are structured as investments but in which the funder has a strong philanthropic motive and neither...

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Recipe for Impact

By Sarah Murray

Delivering nutritious school lunch fare on a large scale is the social mission—and the business model—of Revolution Foods.