Impact Investing

The Upside of CSR

For companies, higher levels of social performance often translate into improved access to funding.

Engaging in corporate social responsibility (CSR) is, of course, a good thing for a company to do. It’s also an image-friendly thing to do. But could it be a financially advantageous thing to do as well? Yes, as it turns out: Investors use reported data on environmental, social, and governance (ESG) practices to help make decisions on which companies to fund.

Those data have become increasingly abundant—a fact that may influence investors’ growing interest in CSR. In the mid-1990s, only...

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Recipe for Impact

By Sarah Murray

Delivering nutritious school lunch fare on a large scale is the social mission—and the business model—of Revolution Foods.