Issue

Fall 2010

Volume 8, Number 4

One of the most difficult things for any entrepreneur to recognize is when the time has come to turn over the reins to someone else. The fall 2010 issue of Stanford Social Innovation Review features an article—“Freeing the Social Entrepreneur”—that explains why it is important for social entrepreneurs to relinquish control. The article goes on to provide a blueprint for the type of leadership team that social entrepreneurs should build, and how it is different from the team that business entrepreneurs create.

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Features

What's Next

Nonprofits & NGOs

Nonprofits Pipe Up

By Suzie Boss

Chris Hughes, Facebook’s cofounder, has created a social media platform called Jumo designed specifically for nonprofits.

Field Report

The Law of Networks - Thumbnail
Human Rights

The Law of Networks

By Sam Scott & Jessie Speer

The Innocence Network, an international collaboration of pro bono legal and investigative organizations, grows rapidly and flexibly.

Case Study

Viewpoint

Big Business Matters - Thumbnail
Leadership

Big Business Matters

By Judith Samuelson 7

Social intrapreneurs—change agents already working deep within business—are the answer for business’s woes.

Innovating Public Systems - Thumbnail
Advocacy

Innovating Public Systems

By Stephen Goldsmith

With these seven levers, social entrepreneurs can foster change in everything from affordable housing to child welfare to poverty alleviation.

Research

Buzz Control - Thumbnail
Nonprofits & NGOs

Buzz Control

By Jessica Ruvinsky 1

Social media is a powerful marketing tool. But how do you control your message once it goes viral and is in the hands of the public?

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Health

The Value of Free

By Jessica Ruvinsky

People are more likely to use products that they pay for, but when it comes to malaria-preventing bed nets in Africa, the opposite holds true.

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Governance

Unsoiled Reputations

By Jessica Ruvinsky

Family-owned firms pollute less than nonfamily firms; and that is due to the family values that these firms were founded upon.

Books

THE CLIMATE WAR:
True Believers, Power
Brokers, and the Fight
to Save the Earth
Eric Pooley
Environment

Climate Soldiers

Reviewed By Stephen H. Schneider 5

The Climate War: True Believers, Power Brokers, and the Fight to Save the Earth by Eric Pooley

Q&A

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