Winter 2011

Volume 9, Number 1

The winter 2011 issue of Stanford Social Innovation Review features one of the publication’s most popular articles—“Collective Impact.” This article, written by John Kania and Mark Kramer of the consulting firm FSG, lays out a clear framework for how organizations across all sectors can work together to achieve a common goal, such as improving K-12 education or cleaning up a river. The Collective Impact approach has been adopted by hundreds of organizations around the world.

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Collective Impact

By John Kania & Mark Kramer 101

Large-scale social change requires broad cross-sector coordination, not the isolated intervention of individual organizations.

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Disseminating Orphan Innovations

By Susan H. Evans & Peter Clarke 3

Disseminating innovations takes a distinct, sophisticated skill set, one that often requires customizing the program to new circumstances, not replicating.

What's Next


Mentoring India’s Youth

By Suzie Boss

The Indian higher education system centers on one test. Avanti Fellows seeks to make the system more accessible to talented but underprivileged students.

Field Report

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Employment Power

By Laura Gehl

How a private-public-academic partnership is helping people with serious mental illnesses find and keep jobs.

Case Study

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Impact Investing

Market-Minded Development

By Hima Batavia, Justin Chakma, Hassan Masum, & Peter Singer 5

Acumen Fund uses impact investing to tackle global poverty. It's approach has garnered attention, but does it change aid?


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An Unusual Merger

By David Grayson 1

A housing and health care charity for the elderly makes British history when it acquires a for-profit care company.



Can’t Buy Me Laughter

By Jessica Ruvinsky

While more money may translate to a higher valuation of oneself, but when it comes to happiness, money is no indicator.



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Manish Bapna

By Eric Nee

Manish Bapna, managing director of World Resources Institute, is helping China manage its environmental problems.

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